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Desktop Engineering Blog

Benefits of 3DEXPERIENCE CATIA for Composite Design & Manufacturing

Paying attention to the careful design and material selection guidelines in the design and manufacturing of composites is vital to ensuring structural integrity of parts. Without adherence to guidelines in designing composites, this can lead to the development of poor-quality parts, which isn’t going to help anyone.

This is extremely important as the benefits of strong composite designs include the production of lightweight, impact resistant and strong parts compared to standard metal products. Ultimately, this leads to the manufacturing of better quality parts for a better-quality product, especially when these parts will be used in aircraft where safety protocols are extremely stringent. 

The production of better-quality parts is also important due to Governmental crackdowns on carbon emissions, particularly for aircrafts. But with composite design, the reduction in fuel costs and carbon emissions based on the production of lightweight structures helps to adhere to Governmental pressures.

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Topics: 3DEXPERIENCE, Aerospace, Composites, CATIA

CATIA Composer with Composite Part Data

In this short video, see how CATIA Composer can import native CATIA V5 Composite parts, and preserve all of the Composite Design and Analysis data for use in creating rich 3D documentation.

A simple example of a CATIA V5 Composite part is used in the video, modelled using the 'Zone Approach' with one main laminate and four thicker, reinforcement laminates. 

Learn how to open and select the CATPart from your file browser and see how it replicates in Composer, with all the geometry included.  You will now have the ability to design and capture multiple scenes (or views) as well as create high quality key-frame based animations. 

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Topics: Various - CAD CAM FEA PLM, Dassault Systemes, Training, Composites, CATIA

Composite Zoning Optimisation

It is for good reasons that designing laminated composite structures is sometimes known as a ‘black art’.  It is not easy to intuit from the topology of and loads applied to a component what a good ply layup should be.  Many companies rely on the wisdom of veteran engineers’ hard won experience, but sometimes it is necessary to take a step back and ask “what else could we try?”.

Often the design of a composite layup starts with the definition of zones within a part.  The layup on each of these zones can then be fettled using FEA to arrive at a stacking sequence which can then be used to define plies. 

But how do you choose the zones? Is it arbitrary based on the topology of the part? Do you just chequer-board your panel into regular squares?  You could use a technique developed with MSC Nastran for one of the F1 companies.

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Topics: MSC Software, Finite Element Analysis (FEA), MSC Nastran, Composites